The Sloane Court Clinic
11 Sloane Court West
London SW3 4TD

Appointments:
+44 (0)20 7730 5945
Reception:
+44 (0)20 7730 5945
Fax:
+44 (0)20 7730 9871

Our opening times are:

  • Mon–Thu: 9am to 7pm
  • Friday: 9am to 6pm
  • Saturdays: Morning only.

E-Mail:
office@sloanecourtclinic.com

Web:
www.sloanecourtclinic.com

Location Details
Map

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The view down Sloane Court West, Chelsea, London

Local Activities, Places and Shops.

When visiting the Clinic why not get to explore the area?

Sloane Square
Sloane Square

Sloane Square is a bustling square which like Sloane Street is named after Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753) a doctor and past president of the Royal College of Physicians, a collector whose collected works were used to form the basis of the British Museum, the person accredited with inventing milk chocolate, among many other achievements during a long and distinguished life.

Sir Hans Sloane
Paule Ka

Leading north from Sloane Square is Sloane Street. While the Knightsbridge end of this busy street has long been associated with exclusive fashion boutiques, the same is increasingly the case at the Sloane Square end. Chloé, Paule Ka, and Zadig & Voltaire being just three.

Sir Hans Sloane
The Cadogan Hotel

Sample the afternoon tea at the genteel townhouse Cadogan Hotel (half way up Sloane Street (number 75) on the left) for a real treat – indeed why not stay there (+ 44 (0)20 7235 7141). It was room 118 that was the scene of the arrest of Oscar Wilde in 1895. When staying there take a morning walk in the private gardens of Cadogan Place opposite. William Wilberforce (1759–1833), campaigner for the abolition of the slave trade, lived in the terraced house at No. 44 on the far side of the gardens.

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Andrew's Pharmacy
Sir Hans Sloane
William Wilberforce's House

For prescriptions, cosmetics, toiletries and gifts visit Andrew’s pharmacy at 149B Sloane Street, (+44 (0) 207-730-1018) close to Holy Trinity Church Sloane Square This church Sir John Betjeman called the ‘Cathedral of the Arts & Crafts Movement’, and that indeed is what it is, containing treasures by William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones among many others and being four inches wider than St Paul’s cathedral.

Sir Hans Sloane
Cadogan Hall

Consider also a visit to the Cadogan Hall where the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is resident. It is in Sloane Terrace, the first road on the right as you walk past the church and Andrew’s pharmacy.

If you arrive at Sloane Square by underground train – as you alight look up at the large square iron pipe that traverses the station above the platforms carrying the River Westbourne, one of a number of London’s underground rivers, on its journey from Hampstead to an outfall in the Thames, close to Chelsea bridge.

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Peter Jones store.

Peter Jones is the imposing department store standing on the west side of Sloane Square. Established by a Welshman in 1877 it was bought by John Lewis in 1905. The impressive store (in 1930 the first example of a curtain wall building in London) is the result of a £207 million renovation which was completed in 2004. The shop however is notable for more than what you see; it like other stores in the John Lewis group is run on co-operative principles introduced by John Lewis’ son Spedan Lewis – the Partnership.  It is Britain’s biggest and oldest example of worker co-ownership and has grown to be Britain’s largest department store group. All permanent staff are Partners in the business and share in its profits.

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The Royal Court Theatre

The Royal Court Theatre is situated in Sloane Square opposite Peter Jones and adjacent to the Underground station. It is Britain's leading national company dedicated to new work by innovative writers from the UK and around the world. It was described by the New York Times as ‘the most important theatre in Europe’.

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La Bottega Brasserie
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Oriel Brasserie

Oriel Brasserie at 51 Sloane Square is a convenient place for breakfast, a coffee, or a light lunch. Minutes from the Clinic however is La Bottega at 65 Lower Sloane Street where you will be greeted enthusiastically by the cheery Italian staff. It is a thriving and tasteful Italian café – our favourite due to its exquisite coffee (if it is quiet ask how to make a cappuccino properly), wonderful ciabata rolls, and ever changing menu.
For supper why not try Manicomio (85 Duke of York Square, +44 (0) 20 7730 3366) a smart, contemporary Italian restaurant situated in a building which once housed a military asylum, the name translates from the Italian as “madhouse”.

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John Sandoe Books
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Potterton Books

Along the street from La Bottega is Potterton Books (93 Lower Sloane Street), a small independent bookshop housing a collection of reference books on architecture, antiques, interior design, fashion, gardening and more. Another bookshop to visit is the rather larger independent shop of John Sandoe, on three floors of an 18th century building just off the top of Kings Road (close to Pret) at 10 Blacklands Terrace, +44 (0)20 7589 9473.

King’s Road leads off the eastly side of Sloane Square – a fashionable street of boutiques, coffee shops and more. A visit to Partridges food store should not be missed – adjacent to King’s Road in Duke of York Square, just a few minutes from Sloane Square. In January 1994 Partridges was granted the Royal Warrant as Grocers to Her Majesty the Queen.

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Saatchi Gallery

For contemporary art visit the world-class collection of the Saatchi Gallery at its spacious new home at the Duke of York’s HQ, Duke of York’s Square (accessible from King’s Road).

Cadogan Gardens
Cadogan Gardens

Walk down Sloane Court West turning right on to Royal Hospital Road and see the splendour of Sir Christopher Wren’s Royal Hospital Chelsea, home of the Chelsea Pensioners. It was founded by Charles II in 1682. Note the classical architecture of its new infirmary by Quinlan Terry – visible as you look south down Sloane Court West.

Chelsea Physic Garden
Chelsea Physic Garden

A longish walk past the Royal Hospital leads you to the Chelsea Physic Garden, which was founded in 1673 by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries; it continues to research the properties, origins and conservation of over 5000 species of plants.

If you have contributions to make to this guide to the area do e-mail us.